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Living in Soweto, South Africa

You are a black South African living in Soweto.  In what ways has the country changed since the end of apartheid?  What changes do you think still need to be made?

Handout

Link to 'Living in Soweto, South Africa' pdf

How this fits

This scenario invites pupils to think about the legacy of apartheid in South Africa in terms of variations in levels of development in the country.

Curriculum links

Geography:

1.2b Knowing where places and landscapes are located, why they are there, the patterns and distributions they create, how and why these are changing and the implications for people.

1.3b Making links between scales to develop understanding of geographical ideas.

1.5a Understanding how sequences of events and activities in the physical and human worlds lead to a change in places, landscapes and societies.

2.1g Solve problems and make decisions to develop analytical skills and creative thinking about geographical issues.

3g Human geography, built and managed environments and human processes.

History: 

1.3a Identifying and explaining change and continuity within and across periods of history.

2.1b Reflect critically on historical questions or issues.

3i The impact of significant political, social, cultural, religious, technological and/or economic developments and events on past European and world societies.

Citizenship:

1.1c Considering how democracy, justice, toleration, respect and freedom are valued by people with different beliefs, backgrounds and traditions within a changing democratic society.

2.1a Engage with and reflect on different ideas, opinions, beliefs and values when exploring topical and controversial issues and problems. 

Where to go

History & Politics; Education & Jobs; Poverty & Healthcare; Economy & Industry; Apartheid; Mandela square.

What to watch

The market (video); Apartheid (video).

Follow-up questions

  1. Do you think most South Africans feel optimistic about the future of their country?  Why/why not?
  2. What might be the main worry of someone growing up in Soweto?

Tags: development; inequality; poverty; population & settlement; employment

About scenarios:

Scenarios are teaching resources designed for use in the classroom or as homework. They are linked to the National Curriculum and content on the Our Africa website. See about scenarios for more information on the topics used and their position in the curriculum.



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