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Unrest and economic development in Ivory Coast

You are an economist working for the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).  You have been asked to briefly summarise what effect the unrest of the decade has had on the economic development of Ivory Coast.

Handout

Link to 'Unrest and economic development in Ivory Coast' pdf

How this fits

This scenario requires pupils to think about the effects of war and unrest on the development of a country.  Pupils might be made aware of other conflicts in the region so that they gain an appreciation of how widespread the issue is.

Curriculum links

Geography:

1.3b Making links between scales to develop understanding of geographical ideas.

1.5a Understanding how sequences of events and activities in the physical and human worlds lead to a change in places, landscapes and societies.

2.1d Analyse and evaluate evidence, presenting findings to draw and justify conclusions.

3h Interactions between people and their environments, including causes and consequences of these interactions, and how to plan for and mange their future impact.

Citizenship: 

1.3d Exploring community cohesion and the different forces that bring about change in communities over time.

Where to go

Economy & Industry; Education & Jobs; History & Politics; Poverty & Healthcare.

What to watch

Arts & crafts (video).

Follow-up questions

  1. What might have been the cause of the unrest in Ivory Coast?
  2. What effect would the unrest have had on ordinary people living in Ivory Coast?

Tags: development; economic activities

About scenarios:

Scenarios are teaching resources designed for use in the classroom or as homework. They are linked to the National Curriculum and content on the Our Africa website. See about scenarios for more information on the topics used and their position in the curriculum.

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